More Rivetting

To explain it in the most basic way-  rivetting is the old way of connecting two pieces of metal together.  Usually, holes are punched in both pieces of metal, and a red-hot steel pin with a head on top, is inserted in the holes.  Then two workers, each armed with pneumatic rivetting guns, fitted with hardened steel cups at the ends, push against the two sides of the rivet.  One worker is stabilizing the pre-formed head, while the other is forming the closing head on the other side. 

These days, a much better product is achieved by welding the metal together.  The resulting seam takes less work, is stronger, requires fewer workers and corrodes more slowly.  It also has a completely different finished look.

To achieve the best of both worlds, we are welding hidden seams on the new tender, and rivetting the exposed seams. 

Phil lines up the rivets in the forge to heat them.

Phil lines up the rivets in the forge to heat them.

Shop workers waiting for the rivets to heat to start rivetting.  
Shop workers waiting for the rivets to heat to start rivetting.
Red-hot rivets visible through the porthole of the forge.
Red-hot rivets visible through the porthole of the forge.
Phil runs the red-hot rivet to the tender, and inserts it quickly into the hole. James and DJ stand by, waiting to start.
Phil runs the red-hot rivet to the tender, and inserts it quickly into the hole. James and DJ stand by, waiting to start.
James and DJ put some weight into it, and complete the rivet.  Its loud!
James and DJ put some weight into it, and complete the rivet. This part is loud!
The finished rivet!  (The bolts on either side hold the unrivetted work in place).

The finished rivet! (The bolts on either side hold the unrivetted work in place).

Just 3,182 more to go!

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